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Sand Vacuuming

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Jag3365, Mar 15, 2009.

  1. Jag3365

    Jag3365

    43
    Ratings:
    +0 / 0 / -0
    Hey I have heard dissention on the issue of cleaning sand beds.  99% of the time I hear not to disturb or purge your DSB.  I was under the impression that cleaning the sand (be it replacing or siphoning detrius out) would damage the eco system in the DSB.  I have heard of people siphoning their DSB to remove this stuff manually and distrubing the sand and life within it.  What is everyone's thoughts?  I know a python works well back when I had an UGF and gravel, but sand is a little harder to clean.
     
  2. FishBrain Expert Reefkeeper GIRS Member

    New London
    Ratings:
    +396 / 6 / -0
    I don't vac mine but if you want to i would use a vac with a valve on it so u can slow it down or you will lose some sand.
     
  3. nick

    nick Well-Known ReefKeeper

    754
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    +5 / 0 / -0
    you can you a python just keep the hose kinked with your other hand and it wont suck up the sand
     
  4. mralanjones

    mralanjones Inactive User

    117
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    can you stir the sand around to remove algae
     
  5. FishBrain Expert Reefkeeper GIRS Member

    New London
    Ratings:
    +396 / 6 / -0
    If you are talking about red slime algae "witch is actually a type of bacteria " it won't do any good it will come right back.
     
  6. calebjk Well-Known ReefKeeper

    300
    Cedar Rapids IA
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    +0 / 0 / -0
    i recommend vacuuming out that DSB. The dark cloud of filth living in there can cause a lot of problems... when you are dumping buckets of black water down the drain you will understand what i mean. in my opinion a DSB is overrated. I have been getting closer and closer to going bare bottom all the time.
     
  7. Eric Experienced Reefkeeper

    West Des Moines, IA
    Ratings:
    +33 / 0 / -0
    I've never really cleaned mine on purpose [​IMG] but I only run 1-2".
    Sand sifting gobies (watchman, etc.), certain starfish, and various snails will clean it naturally.
    Just my $.02 worth.
     
  8. AJ

    AJ Inactive User

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    I know very little about the benefits either way, but the sand sifting gobies are entertaining to watch. :) I'm planning on going with a 1" or so sandbed when I setup my next tank.

    --AJ
     
  9. Jag3365

    Jag3365

    43
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    Right now currently have a 3-5" DSB on the tank. I am going to be getting a Goby here pretty soon. I was just wondering if vacuuming the DSB was worth it or not to keep the balance of the tank. I thought the purpose of a DSB was to keep bacteria and pods in the sand to break down the detrius and food. I would hate to vacuum all that up.
     
  10. h2so4hurts

    h2so4hurts Inactive User

    578
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    The purpose of a DSB is to get rid of nitrate naturally. Anaerobic conditions in the DSB promote bacteria that convert NO3 to N2 gas.
     
  11. gb387

    gb387 Inactive User

    802
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    I have a 2-3" sand bed and I use my python to clean it the best I can. I do loose some sand but I just think thats part of it and if I need to I will add more sand.
     
  12. Lee

    Lee Experienced Reefkeeper

    Ratings:
    +0 / 0 / -0
    I don't think there is anything wrong with vacuuming the surface. I wouldn't recommend stirring it up below the top inch though. There is a lot of nasty stuff deep down. If you ever replace your sand bed/tear down your tank you will know what I mean, the smell will be awful and the water will turn black. /DesktopModules/ActiveForums/themes/_default/emoticons/wink.gif
     

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