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Sabae Anenome Question

Discussion in 'General (Hobby Related)' started by JB, Nov 22, 2007.

  1. JB Veteran Reefkeeper

    Marion
    Ratings:
    +3 / 0 / -0
    I was at Pet's Playhouse in Cedar Rapids yesterday and I noticed that they had sabae anenomes and saddleback clowns that were hosting in them.   I was really tempted to get one, but one thing made me think twice:  The anenomes are almost pure white with vibrant purple tips.
    The white color made me think that maybe they were bleached out and not healthy, but I've seen Pet's Playhouse have this same type of anenome before and they are almost always white like that.  
    Could it be that they aren't coloring up because they aren't under much light at Pet's Playhouse or is the white color a sign of another problem.   Maybe white is the right color for that anenome?
    Anyone have any insight?
    -JB
     
  2. got2lb Well-Known ReefKeeper GIRS Member

    499
    Clarksville
    Ratings:
    +10 / 0 / -0
    That's pretty much how I saw them all the time.

    Kind of like this one:

    [​IMG]
     
  3. Guest

    Guest Guest

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    thats how ive always seen them... i think thats just how they are
     
  4. JB Veteran Reefkeeper

    Marion
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    +3 / 0 / -0
    Yep, that's exactly like the ones at Pet's Playhouse. I think they look pretty good. If that is what they look like when they are healthy, I'll go get one.

    -JB
     
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest

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    +0 / 0 / -0
    i have 2 of them in my reef tank thats how thay look ive hade mine for many many months you are ok
     
  6. Marcus Wood

    Marcus Wood Inactive User

    27
    Ratings:
    +0 / 0 / -0
    About all sebaes are sold bleached. It took me months to get it back to health. It will color up brown. I think I have before and after pics in my rc gallery.
     
  7. JB Veteran Reefkeeper

    Marion
    Ratings:
    +3 / 0 / -0
    Ok, good info everyone, thanks!

    If I do get one, how should I go about acclimating it to my tank? It's going to be going from not much light at all (single no bulb) to being under my halides.

    -JB
     
  8. Marcus Wood

    Marcus Wood Inactive User

    27
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    +0 / 0 / -0
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
  9. Marcus Wood

    Marcus Wood Inactive User

    27
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    Acclimate slow. eggcreate and window screens. Start with 4 screens and remove one a week. Feed krill every day.
     
  10. jtesdall

    jtesdall Expert Reefkeeper

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    +1 / 0 / -0
    I have a 12" Purple tipped Sabae. It is completely brown in color and has been even since I got it from the Dr. in Iowa City that tore down his tank to move to Chicago. I have forgotten his name. When I got the nem' I read about them a bunch and white is bad, but it doesn't mean you can't pull them out of it. Every white nem' I have had before this didn't make it, but this one does awesome and eats very well. If it is priced right I would go for it. Seems like the reading I did agreed on about three months to get them back under good conditions and BRIGHT light. I forget what light you have JB, but I'll bet it it is good MH. There is a really good nem' article on RC if I remeber right. I think it is stickied on the nem' topic.
     
  11. JB Veteran Reefkeeper

    Marion
    Ratings:
    +3 / 0 / -0
    Yep, I've got 3 250W 14K's over my tank. I would think that would be more than enough.
    I'm thinking about getting a couple of saddlebacks to (since I know they will host in it) but I'm not sure what I'd do with my 2 false percs (who are clown raised and have no interest in my bubbletip at all).
    -JB
     
  12. jtesdall

    jtesdall Expert Reefkeeper

    Ratings:
    +1 / 0 / -0
    My percs love my Sabae. But to be honest I do not know the difference between false and real percs. I have never taken time to figure this out, anyone want to enlighten me? That article I mentioned also has a list of what percs host in what nems.
     
  13. JB Veteran Reefkeeper

    Marion
    Ratings:
    +3 / 0 / -0
    My percs wer tank raised. I'm pretty sure that's why they don't want to have anything to do with my bubbletip. However, I think that sabea's are on the list that are natural hosts for percs. I don't think bubble tips are a natural host for them.

    -JB
     
  14. jtesdall

    jtesdall Expert Reefkeeper

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    Here is my Sabae
     [​IMG]
     
  15. ZLTFUL

    ZLTFUL Well-Known ReefKeeper

    306
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    I remember bringing that thing back for you Joel...you almost lost it to my ex cause she thought the clowns hosting in it were cute. /site/DesktopModules/NTForums/themes/_default/emoticons/wink.gif
     
  16. jtesdall

    jtesdall Expert Reefkeeper

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    +1 / 0 / -0
    They are cute and the Nem is huge and eats very well. I would say he is my favorite inhabitant.
     
  17. Philby

    Philby Inactive User

    232
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    A true perc is ampheron percula (or close, sorry my latin isn't what it used to be [​IMG]) and a false perc is ampheron occilerous (again sorry, not sure on the spelling of the scientific name). They are almost identical, but there are 2 ways I remember that can tell them apart. 1 is the number of spines on the dorsal (i think true percs have 11 and false have 14??). This is a fail safe way, although hard to tell unless the fish is pretty stationary and in person as pics are sometimes hard to count the spines. Another way is the area around their eyes. True percs tend to have completely black around their pupils, while false percs have orange/dirty around their eyes. This is a "rule of thumb" and isn't true in all cases, but is a good starting point. (it could also be the other way around, maybe Travis will chime in)
    Regardless of tank bred or wild caught - the instinct to host in an anemone is present, but the BTA is not a natural host in the wild, so it may take awhile (if at all) for a true or false perc to host in one. Some people seem to have no trouble at all getting occs/percs to host in BTAs, while others never have it happen.
    Since BTAs are easy to keep and you already have one - I would try to get your percs (or occs) to host in it before trying to get another more difficult species of nem.
    Some people have had luck taping a picture of their species of clown hosting in an anemone to the side of their tank (facing in) near their anem. Don't know how this works but people say it has worked for them. Another thing people have done is to make sure the ambient light in a room is very dark when the tank lights go off, and then shine a flashlight at/around the anem to draw the clowns interests.
    btw - JB does this forum software allow you to view previous posts when making a post. I didn't pay attention to who was asking about what, so if I could have seen the posts prior to mine on this posting screen - i could have directed some answers to the people actually asking them...
     
  18. jtesdall

    jtesdall Expert Reefkeeper

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    Phil, There is a checkbox that says "Show Replies" at the bottom of this reply page. Set it once and it remembers the setting.
     
  19. Philby

    Philby Inactive User

    232
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    SWEET! thanks Joel. I have my browser window set to only about 1/2 my screen while I'm at work and so I don't always see things at the bottom of screens...
     
  20. IowaDiver Well-Known ReefKeeper GIRS Member

    526
    West Des Moines
    Ratings:
    +1 / 0 / -0
    Both of my BTAs bleached out during the summer because of the heat. They were more of a translucent white instead of the opaque white that the sebae anemone is.
    I fed them silversides at first because I was afraid they would die but after awhile I stopped because they seemed to get enough food from the water when I fed the fish.
     

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