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New hobby is growing...

Discussion in 'Introductions' started by kingpin, Aug 31, 2018.

  1. Waterrat41 Addicted Reefer GIRS Member

    214
    Des moines
    Ratings:
    +117 / 0 / -0
    Yes an island, I wish I had put my GSPs on an island...and my zoas. They just keep growing and growing!
     
  2. kingpin

    23
    Boone, IA
    Ratings:
    +3 / 0 / -0
    I may have to take you up on that when the time comes.
     
  3. kingpin

    23
    Boone, IA
    Ratings:
    +3 / 0 / -0
    This is what I've got going for a filter/sump. There is a big rotating drum type filter just below the trays. No idea on the quality of this setup. All new to me.[​IMG]
     
  4. kingpin

    23
    Boone, IA
    Ratings:
    +3 / 0 / -0
    Ammonia level is practically zero, Nitrates are coming up a bit and Nitrites spiked, but seem to be dropping a little every day. I added some guppies and a molly from the FW tank after gradually adapting them to salt. They seem to be getting along great. Changed out the standard bulbs for Actinic. I've been shopping around for a good RO setup, but would really like to get something decent for less than $200. Recommendations on best bang for the buck?


    [​IMG]
     
  5. Actuary Well-Known ReefKeeper GIRS Member

    670
    Adel, IA
    Ratings:
    +134 / 1 / -0
    I can recommend both bulkreefsupply.com and airwaterice.com. You should be able to save some cash if you can find a used one. Just be prepared to swap out the prefilters and RO membrane. Note that there shouldn't be much of a difference between brands on the actual RO/DI systems... they are just canisters that hold filters. Some will have more prefilters than others or additional bells and whistles that may or may not be useful (such as TDS monitors built in).

    I would also suggest getting a TDS meter. They are pretty cheap ($10 on Amazon). I believe Air, Water, and Ice still includes them with their systems.
     
  6. Actuary Well-Known ReefKeeper GIRS Member

    670
    Adel, IA
    Ratings:
    +134 / 1 / -0
    That's a type of wet/dry filter. More commonly you'd see those with the blue bio-balls that have water trickling over them. Not a lot of people (reef keepers in particular) run these types of systems anymore. They are very effective at quickly converting ammonia into nitrite and nitrite into nitrate. So these are a good option for a fish only tank. However, in reef tanks we can rely on live rock for this. Additionally, wet/dry filters are known to result in an accumulation of nitrates.. again fine for a fish only tank where nitrates are relatively harmless until extreme levels. A more common sump set up for reef tanks is a combination of just filter socks and a protein skimmer and maybe a refugium with macro algaes. The primary sump designs today typically fall under the "berlin sump" or the triton sump.

    Based on my experience I'd say you can get away with an extremely simple sump. I've been in the hobby around 10 years now and I just switched to a sump with baffles in it for the first time just last year. If you're going for a reef down the road and add some live rock, I'd suggest trying to remove the wet dry components from the sump if possible.

    One question for you... is that an AquaC Remora skimmer in there? If so, that may be something to consider upgrading down the road. It's probably fine while the bioload is light, but once you get that tank stocked, a bigger skimmer could make things easier on you.
     
  7. kingpin

    23
    Boone, IA
    Ratings:
    +3 / 0 / -0
    Based on what I could find, it does look to be the AquaC. Believe me, there will be upgrades. Slow and steady is not only the theme for getting started, it's also my budget motto ;)
     
  8. Easy E Novice Reefkeeper GIRS Member

    43
    Shellsburg, IA
    Ratings:
    +19 / 0 / -0
    Here is a link to the RO/DI I bought recently. Way less than than $200, and I'm happy with it so far. It has a storage tank and separate outlets for aquarium and drinking water. I also bought a TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) meter and the aquarium water measures 0, which means totally pure.

    REEF & HOME DRINKING RO+DI dual output REVERSE OSMOSIS PURE WATER FILTER SYSTEM | eBay
     
  9. kingpin

    23
    Boone, IA
    Ratings:
    +3 / 0 / -0
    It would be nice to run the drinking line to my refrigerator. Will definitely take a look.
     
  10. Easy E Novice Reefkeeper GIRS Member

    43
    Shellsburg, IA
    Ratings:
    +19 / 0 / -0
    That's what I did. I put a T on the outlet, and ran one line to the drinking water faucet and the other to my ice maker. My wife loves it! I forgot to mention this package deal comes with 2 faucets, so you can have one for your DI aquarium water as well.
     
  11. Actuary Well-Known ReefKeeper GIRS Member

    670
    Adel, IA
    Ratings:
    +134 / 1 / -0
    Might want to take a look at this:
    For Sale - Equipment list

    He's got a nice Air, Water, and Ice RO/DI unit available for a very reasonable price.
     
  12. kingpin

    23
    Boone, IA
    Ratings:
    +3 / 0 / -0
    The cycle appears to be finished. Low level nitrates. Zero ammonia and nitrites. To celebrate the first milestone, picked up my first official saltwater fish. HowverH, he just wants to hang out in the top corner :-(

    IMG_20180916_231433524_BURST000_COVER.jpg
     
  13. mrelaz

    103
    Waterloo, IA
    Ratings:
    +14 / 0 / -0
    I would strongly recommend a refractometer AND calibration fluid. You CANNOT calibrate it to zero with fresh wateR/RODI.
     
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  14. Chief Reef Well-Known ReefKeeper Leadership Team GIRS Member

    384
    Iowa City, IA
    Ratings:
    +107 / 0 / -0
    @mrelaz@mrelaz I also recommend a refractometer or a hydrometer but I've always used RO/DI to calibrate my refractometer. The specific gravity is 1.000 of RO/DI. I'm ganna do some research to see if it's not recommended now Haha
     
  15. mrelaz

    103
    Waterloo, IA
    Ratings:
    +14 / 0 / -0
    Im not sure on that reading-but I do know it’s definitely NOT zero. From personal experience...haha


    Sent from my iPhone via App
     
  16. kingpin

    23
    Boone, IA
    Ratings:
    +3 / 0 / -0
    I'm using a brewer's hydrometer and a calculator to adjust for calibration/temperature difference. Not ideal, but it's what I had lying around the house. I trust it more than the "lever" type that you find at the stores.
     
  17. Actuary Well-Known ReefKeeper GIRS Member

    670
    Adel, IA
    Ratings:
    +134 / 1 / -0
    It's probably fine for a clownfish. Heck you can bring most fish down to hyposalinity levels of 12 ppt without issues (natural saltwater is 35 ppt). I wouldn't put a coral or an invert in the tank until you get a refractometer though. And as others have said definitely get the calibration fluid. When I calibrate my refractometer with RO, my refractometer shows 35 ppt water to be 28 ppt. Not an expensive purchase and takes away a lot of variables for you. A refractometer can be found on Amazon for $20 and calibration fluid runs for $7 and will last you an extremely long time.
     
  18. kingpin

    23
    Boone, IA
    Ratings:
    +3 / 0 / -0
    I'll add refractometer to my shopping list. Are snails and shrimp particularly sensitive to water conditions? I'd like to get a jump on the algae growth and send in a CUC.

    Finally got a decent picture of the clownfish. Can anyone tell me what variant it is? Just a generic one or do the markings make it a unique type? The fins accented in black and outlined in orange really make it pop. He/she finally left the corner and is all over the tank now.

    [​IMG]
     
  19. mrelaz

    103
    Waterloo, IA
    Ratings:
    +14 / 0 / -0
    Lightning Maroon! I’ve got a pair. And they’re mean!!


    Sent from my iPhone via App
     
  20. Actuary Well-Known ReefKeeper GIRS Member

    670
    Adel, IA
    Ratings:
    +134 / 1 / -0
    Inverts will be much more sensitive to salinity.. it varies between species though. Between 32 ppt and 36 ppt is where you'd want to be.
     

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