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Looking to Buy 1st saltwater tank

Discussion in 'Buy/Sell/Trade' started by Ryan H, Dec 30, 2017.

  1. AdamLawrence Well-Known ReefKeeper

    453
    Marion, IA
    Ratings:
    +143 / 0 / -0
    Snice you work in CR you are more than welcome to stop at my place I'm in marion.

    Sent from my SM-G955U via App
     
  2. abower Well-Known ReefKeeper

    465
    Ryan, Ia
    Ratings:
    +74 / 1 / -0
    Guys, this is his first salt. Let's keep it basic and go to level 2 later.

    I agree with Adam. Damsels are pricks. Cut them out unless you want to so an aggressive tank with predators.
     
  3. Alex Crittenden GIRS Member

    78
    West Des Moines, IA
    Ratings:
    +38 / 0 / -0
    BRS has a lot of good info on youtube. Researching before you get going is a huge part of success. If you can learn and plan as much as possible up front it'll save you headaches later on. I understand being antsy to get things up and going, but if you're patient now and learn you'll be super thankful in a year.
     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2018
  4. Ryan H

    21
    Luzerne
    Ratings:
    +0 / 0 / -0
    Thanks Gang
     
  5. Ryan H

    21
    Luzerne
    Ratings:
    +0 / 0 / -0

    I just always heard it is a good idea to start with damsels since they are cheap and helps know your tank is ready for fish. So if I am just purchasing a tank and stand what else would I need to get started? All Glass tank no holes drilled or nothing...
     
  6. Ryan H

    21
    Luzerne
    Ratings:
    +0 / 0 / -0
    Thanks Adam
     
  7. clown man Well-Known ReefKeeper GIRS Member

    554
    West Liberty, IA
    Ratings:
    +15 / 1 / -0
    I got that 90 tank stand and sump be a good jump start tank is drilled
     
  8. Derek34 GIRS Member

    114
    Manchester, IA
    Ratings:
    +14 / 0 / -0
    I also agree with staying away from Damsels. They most likely will cause you stress and headaches down the road. Also as others have said going bigger is better. If you go small you will just end up spending more money to go bigger down the road. I know!! :) In my opinion you are ahead to get a pre-drilled tank. If you don't you will have to rely on an overflow box. I used one for a while with no issues however they do increase your chances of having a flood if they quit working. You don't have this worry with a drilled tank (also known as a reef ready tank).
     
  9. abower Well-Known ReefKeeper

    465
    Ryan, Ia
    Ratings:
    +74 / 1 / -0
    Buy an emerald crab. $8, decently hearty but sensitive to ammonia. If you decide you dont want him (thry cause no harm) they move an i.pressive foot a minute. If you put a damsel in there and want him out later you'll go mad. You will never catch him without pulling all the rock and even then is a feat of strength
     
  10. AdamLawrence Well-Known ReefKeeper

    453
    Marion, IA
    Ratings:
    +143 / 0 / -0
    My wife and I tried catching a 6 line wrasse once it took 4hrs and the removal of the rock just to pot him in a time out lol


    Sent from my SM-G955U via App
     
  11. melston87

    17
    Marion Iowa
    Ratings:
    +2 / 0 / -0
    if you r ptient ill hve . 75 crylic for free. sorry for typo, keybord is missing keys lol.
     
  12. melston87

    17
    Marion Iowa
    Ratings:
    +2 / 0 / -0
    how is tht coming?
     
  13. Bud Loves Bacon Website Team Board of Directors Leadership Team GIRS Member

    West Des Moines, IA
    Ratings:
    +1,695 / 14 / -0
  14. Cameron GIRS Member

    28
    Urbandale, IA
    Ratings:
    +9 / 0 / -0
    I've done a ton of freshwater and started my first saltwater last year and it's a completely different ballgame. The biggest difference in my opinion is that saltwater is a way more complex biome. In freshwater, it's basically fish and a couple of water changes. In saltwater there are so many more organisms that need to come together to make the tank cycle and stay stable. I mean, I've never seen so many different types of algae, as in bad algae, like brown algae, hair algae, bubble algae, white crystally things, tiny white hairy thing.... and new things are still appearing, which I just hope my CUC's will eat up before it takes over. It's a fantastic hobby, but it's a magnitude more difficult than freshwater, so patience patience patience. Oh and do come to Springfest and meet the GIRS folks, they're a great community.
     
  15. Bud Loves Bacon Website Team Board of Directors Leadership Team GIRS Member

    West Des Moines, IA
    Ratings:
    +1,695 / 14 / -0
    The more I learn about this hobby, the more I am coming to the conclusion that everyone makes it harder than it needs to be. It's hard to explain that in just a few sentences, but there's a ton of marketing going on and I'll kind of leave it at that.
     
  16. abower Well-Known ReefKeeper

    465
    Ryan, Ia
    Ratings:
    +74 / 1 / -0
    Agreed. At some point hobbyists need to realize something isn't perfect but good enough. This is why I avoid sites like reef builders. Every product they show is a "savior" to your tank. The most common and expensive one in my mind is di resin. At the end of ro process I am at 3 ppm... and your telling me that isn't brilliantly good? I don't think it's worth the cost to overcome 3 ppm. And over 5 years I have failed to see any negative effects of 3 ppm.

    Avoid the marketing
     

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